Blog :: 2015

Flying is for the birds

Since the beginning of time, Man has wanted to take to the sky.

This is why I am getting involved with a new Aerial Imaging Company called Media Wing (www.MediaWing.com) It is devoted to marketing from the ground up for everything from real estate videos to golf club, accident scenes, sporting events and land and development aerial surveys.

 

Unlike icarus who simply came to close to the sun to keep airborn, I am securly planted on the ground with complete control of one of our many drones.

 

For fun here are some flights in history that didn't quite make it.

 

First Flight from Michael Travis on Vimeo.

Challenger and Columbia

 

I was in NYC at my office when #Challenger went down 29 years ago, Then in NH at the #McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center when Space Shuttle #Columbia went down in 2003. At that time my 8 year old daughter wanted to be an Astronaut.

The news crews and newspaper reporters were there while we sat in the #Space Shuttle #Discovery cockpit simulator doing a mock safe landing. With WMURs camera in my unshaven face and my 8 year old daughter on my lap, I was asked how I felt. I noted how ironic it was being there doing a simulated safe landing on that day of the second Space Shuttle disaster. My daughter turned around in her innocence and said "and I crashed" That part was edited out of the story. But the emotion of these two disasters can never be edited out of our lives.

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/missions/51-l/movies/51-l-launch2.mpg

 

New Hampshire Trivia

  1. Of the thirteen original colonies, New Hampshire was the first to declare its independence from Mother England -- a full six months before the Declaration of Independence was signed. 
     
  2. The highest wind speed recorded at ground level is at Mt. Washington, on April 12, 1934. The winds were three times as fast as those in most hurricanes. 
     
  3. New Hampshire is the only state that ever played host at the formal conclusion of a foreign war. In 1905, Portsmouth was the scene of the treaty ending the Russo-Japanese War. 
     
  4. The first potato planted in the United States was at Londonderry Common Field in 1719. 
     
  5. Alan Bartlett Shepard Jr., the first American to travel in space is from East Derry, New Hampshire. 
     
  6. In 1833 the first free public library in the United States was established in Peterborough. 
     
  7. In the town of Warner the last passenger train stopped on November 4, 1955, and the last freight in 1961. Since then the tracks through town were torn up and sold as scrap iron. 
     
  8. New Hampshire adopted the first legal lottery in the twentieth century United States in 1963. 
     
  9. Cornish Hill Pottery Company handcrafts functional stoneware decorated in the traditions of Early American and European potters with a method known as "slip trailing". The slip is a creamy mixture of clay and water and is applied to moist, almost hardened pots by hand. The slip contains various colorants, including natural clay colors and metals. 
     
  10. New Hampshire's present constitution was adopted in 1784; it is the second oldest in the country. 
     
  11. On December 30, 1828, about 400 mill girls walked out of the Dover Cotton Factory enacting the first women's strike in the United States. The Dover mill girls were forced to give in when the mill owners immediately began advertising for replacement workers. 
     
  12. Levi Hutchins of Concord invented the first alarm clock in 1787. 
     
  13. The Irish-born American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens lived and worked in Cornish from 1885 until his death at age 59 in 1907. 
     
  14. The Mount Washington auto road at Great Glen is New Hampshire's oldest manmadetourist attraction
     
  15. In the fall of 1999, the Town of Newbury officially opened a B&M caboose as a visitor center at Bell Cove, Newbury Harbor. 
     
  16. Daniel Webster was a politician and statesman, born at Franklin in 1782. He was known in his day as a mighty orator, a reputation preserved in the Stephen Vincent Benet story The Devil and Daniel Webster, in which he beats the original lawyer, Lucifer, in a contract case over a man’s soul. 
     
  17. New Hampshire’s State House is the oldest state capitol in which a legislature still meets in its original chambers. 
     
  18. Alexandria was the birthplace of Luther C. Ladd, the first enlisted soldier to lose his life in the Civil War. 
     
  19. The very first motorized ascent of the Mount Washington auto road was by Feelan O. Stanley, of Stanley Steamer fame, in 1899. 
     
  20. Dover was settled in 1623. It is the oldest permanent settlement in New Hampshire. 
     
  21. The karner blue butterfly, lynx, bald eagle, short nose sturgeon, Sunapee trout, Atlantic salmon and dwarf wedge mussel are on the State's endangered species list. 
     
  22. Founded in 1866 at Durham, the University of New Hampshire serves an undergraduate population of 10,500 students. 
     
  23. The Enfield Shaker community was one of eighteen villages located from Maine to Kentucky and from Massachusetts to Ohio. 
     
  24. The quintessential New England community of Wolfeboro is known as "The Oldest Summer Resort in America". 
     
  25. Augustus Saint-Gaudens from Cornish was the first sculptor to design an American coin. His commission became fraught with difficulties related to Saint-Gaudens’ desire for high relief relative to the demands of mass production and use. 
     
  26. America's Stonehenge is a 4000 year old megalithic (stone constructed) site located on Mystery Hill in Salem and presently serves as a leisurely, educational tour for the whole family. 
     
  27. The Pierce Manse in Concord is the home of the only New Hampshire citizen ever elected President. Franklin Pierce was a hero of the war with Mexico and the youngest President elected at that time. 
     
  28. The Memorial Bell Tower at Cathedral of the Pines in Rindge has four bronze bas-reliefs designed by Norman Rockwell. The bell tower is specifically dedicated to women — military and civilian — who died serving their country. 
     
  29. The first free public library in the United States was established at Peterborough in 1833. 
     
  30. The Bavarian-style hamlet of Merrimack is home to the famous eight-horse hitch, and the Clydesdales maintained by the Anheuser-Busch Brewery. 
     
  31. Cannon Aerial Tramway is the first aerial passenger tramway in North America. It was built in 1938 at Franconia Notch. 
     
  32. In Holderness Captain Pierre Havre and his canine first mate, Bogie, have built a sailing tour around the locations from the Katherine Hepburn/Henry Fonda movie On Golden Pond. 
     
  33. The Christa McAuliffe Planetarium in Concord is a state-of-the art planetarium dedicated to the memory of New Hampshire teacher Christa McAuliffe, who died in the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. 
     
  34. New Hampshire's state motto is "Live Free or Die". The motto comes from a statement written by the Revolutionary General John Stark, hero of the Battle of Bennington. 
     
  35. As leaders in the revolutionary cause, New Hampshire delegates received the honor of being the first to vote for the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. 
     
  36. New Hampshire has 10 counties, 13 municipalities, 221 towns and 22 unincorporated places. 
     
  37. Sarah Josepha Hale author and journalist who wrote the poem "Mary Had a Little Lamb" in 1830 is from Newport, New Hampshire. 
     
  38. The Belknap Mill built at Laconia in 1823 is the oldest unaltered brick knitting mill in America. 
     
  39. The Blue Ghost of Wolfeboro is the U.S. Mail Boat for Lake Winnipesaukee. It makes a daily 60-mile loop delivering mail to 30 stops at camps and islands around the lake. 
     
  40. At Stonyfield Farm in Londonderry you can learn how yogurt is made. From cow to incubator to cooler. They give away samples and you can buy some “moo” chandise. 
     
  41. New Hampshire did not officially adopt a state flag until 1909. Prior to that, New Hampshire had numerous regimental flags to represent the state. The present flag has only been changed once, in 1931 when the state's seal was modified. 
     
  42. The USS Albacore was a prototype submarine built at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and commissioned in 1953. At the time she was the fastest submarine ever designed. 
     
  43. The first capital city of New Hampshire was in Exeter
     
  44. The granite profile "Old Man of the Mountain" is one of the most famous natural landmarks in the state. The Old Man’s head measures 40 feet from chin to forehead and is made up of five ledges. Nature carved this profile thousands of years ago. The natural sculpture is 1,200 feet above Echo Lake. 
     
  45. It takes approximately 40 gallons of sap to make approximately 1 gallon of maple syrup. 
     
  46. Wallace D. Lovell built the Hampton River Bridge in 1900 called the "mile-long bridge". It was reputed to be the longest wooden bridge in the world. 
     
  47. Captain John Smith named New Hampshire after the town of Hampshire, England. 
     
  48. New Hampshire has a changeable climate, with wide variations in daily and seasonal temperatures. The variations are affected by proximity to the ocean, mountains, lakes or rivers. The state enjoys all four seasons. Summers are short and cool; winters are long and cold; fall is glorious with foliage. The weather station on Mount Washington has recorded some of the coldest temperatures and strongest winds in the continental United States. 
     
  49. New Castle is the smallest town in New Hampshire. It covers .8 square miles, or 512 acres. The town is composed of one large island and several smaller islands, and serves as a scenic residential and recreational community. 
     
  50. The Pembroke Glass Works produced crown window glass from 1839 until 1850. The process of gathering molten glass on a blowpipe, and blowing the glass into a balloon shape. The blowpipe is removed, a solid "punty" rod is attached and the glass is spun rapidly until a disc is formed. When the glass cools the outer portion beyond the central knob is then cut into panes

Famous people from New Hampshire are as follows:

  • Robert Frost, Poet that won four Pulitzer Prizes
  • Sarah Josepha Hale, Author and journalist
  • John Irving, Famous author
  • Christa McAuliffe, died in space shuttle Challenger explosion
  • in 1986
  • Bob Montana, Creator of the comic strip Archie in 1942
  • Franklin Pierce, The 14th President of the United States
  • Eleanor Porter, Children?s author
  • Alan B. Shepard Jr., first American in space in 1961
  • Earl Silas Tupper, Founder of Tupperware
  • Eleazar Wheelock, Founded Dartmouth College in 1769
  • Henry Wilson, Vice President of the United States under President Ulysses Grant
  • Michael Travis- your Waterfront Agent

 

Building boats that build character

My Daughter Mariella, age 15 by her wonderful Canoe she built, The "Free Spirit"

Since 1992, the Boat Museum in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire had the idea of preserving the boating heritage of the New Hampshire Lakes for all of us to remember. For me, beginning at 8:30 Am on July 5th, 2011 it became a place to actually build a boat with my fifteen-year-old daughter Mariella, a time for us to never forget.
In an age of instant messaging, instant this and instant that, so many things grab the attention of peoples lives. And, here we were, getting up early in the morning, standing under tents in 80+ degree weather for at least 6 hours a day for 6 days, making a boat that requires teamwork, patience, time, diligence and a lot of learning. It was hard work. It was hot. Yet Mariella would be knocking on my shoulder to wake me up to get going.
In my life, boats have always built fond memories; from challenging fellow 8 year old campers in canoes cut in half at Camp Deerhorn in Wisconsin, sailing at my grandfather’s place on Lake Michigan, traveling by boat everywhere before being allowed to drive a car at our family’s island cottage in Canada, cruising in Boston Harbor, enjoying the views from the Mt Washington on Winnipesaukee, and morning kayaking on a small lake in Northwood with my daughter.
Building a boat brings a whole new level of memories to cherish.

Building Boats, My Early Years.
I remember as a kid helping to build a “McGregor Bay Sled” up at our family’s cottage in Canada. These were big flat bottom utility boats, 4 feet wide, 16 feet long, and could carry anything, weighed a ton, and go anywhere slow. It was made with heavy marine plywood, a bunch of bolts, gallons of glue, and some lead paint I am sure. When the transom rotted, we would simply cut off the bad part, move it forward and screw it back on until it got so bow heavy that the propeller stuck out of the water in the stern. It took two weeks and 5 of us to build.

Building Boats, Our Wolfeboro Week
At the Boat Museum, Mariella and I built something far more elegant, far more refined, and far less heavy. It is called a “six-hour canoe” –The six-hour part –well that was how long it took for us to put the two sides together. It was really a six-day canoe for us. We made it by hand out of wood—cutting, bending, nailing, screwing, planning, sanding, fiberglassing, varnishing, and painting--into a masterpiece –using the many tools provided--and a lot of patience.
We also were able to add personal touches including a curved deck on the bow and stern held down by brass nails and a few brass goodies from Bradley's Hardware and Goodhue and Hawkins.

 

For the price of a normal summer camp, the New Hampshire Boat Museum Boat Building Program---well you came away with a beautiful boat, and memories that will last a lifetime.


“Free Spirit”, a canoe designed in the past, was built with newly learned skills, by Mariella’s own talented hands.
 

Here is a video my daughter made of the making of Free Spirit.

Video on Mariella's "Free Spirit" at the Boat Building School NH

Building Free Spirit was an great experience. And it only took six days!  Enjoy :)

Posted by Mariella Travis on Friday, September 2, 2011
 
                               
Check out the Boat Building Program and other events won't you?

 

New Hampshire Boat Museum

399 Center St., Wolfeboro Falls, NH

EMAIL

museum@nhbm.org

WEB SITE:

http://www.nhbm.org

603.569.4554

HOURS

OPEN: Memorial Day Weekend through Columbus Day

Monday through Saturday 10 – 4
Sunday Noon – 4

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    All about Drones or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

      

       

       

    UAVs  also known as "Unmanned Aerial Vehicles", are commonly known as a drone.  It is also referred to as an unpiloted aerial vehicle.  Drones have been used by the military for a long time and codger up scary images and uses. There is no doubt that Drones are now going to be a big part of Real Estate and Commercial uses. With drones, comes issues, from safety to privacy to regulations on who and how they can be used--from aerial photography to delivering packages, Pizzas and --well the list is endless. There are as many drones as there are uses. 

    Below are stories about drones, their uses, and the regulations that will be dictating how the business of drones will fly.

     

    Stories on Drones


     

    Life on Long Pond creates Life Long Memories

     

    I have lived on Long Pond since 2001 and know it to be a hidden Gem. There are 1300 lakes in New Hampshire and 11 are called "Long Pond". 

    The first question I get is what is a difference between a lake and a pond--in New Hampshire it simply might be the spelling. There are 250 acre ponds and 100 acer lakes. No real explanation

    You see, this Long Pond I am talking about is around 100 acres--so not a puddle but not a huge lake.  It is a quiet lake really--Not inundated with jetskies and powerboats. You will see kayaks, beaver, deer, and a few loons--and I am referring to the bird types. It is also I am told over 120 feet deep in one part, spring fed very clean and filled with fish. People here have come back for many summers and now there are many more year round residents. Afterall Northwood has Coe Brown Academy which is a highly rated hich school--really a private school all the kids go to in town.  It is also known as antique Alley--and centrally located between Concord and Portsmouth BManchester Airport and the White Mountains all within an hour.  For those weekenders only 90 minutes to Boston.  Here is a wonderful example of a perfect Long Pond Getaway.

       

    When you drive down the winding private road through a Model Tree Forest all of your stresses go away. Long Pond is 100 acre spring fed very deep very clean pristine private lake unspoiled and under developed with 3 islands, resident loons, beaver and everything Mother Nature can provide. This cabin is the ideal getaway with privacy and a huge Association sandy beach you can call your own most of the time.  Inside you enjoy the benefits of an enclosed porch, outdoor deck. Inside there is an ample kitchen and living area, 3 bedrooms and enclosed porch newly renovated kitchen and full bath. Below is a large open plan basement for all of your tools and toys.  There is also a very well established association. Come home to where people can only dream of vacationing. Get away from it all yet be close to everything you need. Within 45 minutes of Gunstock, Concord, Portsmouth, Lake Winnipesaukee, Manchester Airport and 90 minutes to Boston.

    Enjoy life as it should be.  
          -- Michael Travis

     

     

    What the Three Little Piggies can teach us about the real estate market.

    What the Three Little Piggies can teach us about the real estate market.

    We all know the story, the big bad wolf keeps creating havoc on the homes of the three little pigs.

    The first little pig took the easy route made his house with straw. His brother little piggy built his out of sticks which was a little better. As I recall the big bad wolfed huffed and he puffed and blew their houses down--some versions have him having the brothers for lunch as well.

    Big Bad Wolf as Buyer
    OK, lets say the big bad wolf is a buyer--he looks at your home and sees cheap fixtures and chinzy cabinets and really bad workmanship or lets say the roof looks like it will leak with the next puff. . Well that will translate in this buyer to think the whole place is going to fall down--or needs to be redone-doesn't matter how much money you spent at Cheap Depot.  
    So lets say you are wanting to buy a house that needs work.  Well third little piggy might apply for a 203-K rehab loan that will allocates an additional $35,000 for repairs and improvements. Here is a link to info on this type of loan.

    Big Bad Wolf as Home Inspector
    Most buyers will hire a home inspector--I suggest you have an inspection done in advance to get a feel for issues that may come up. Thre are many great Licensed home inspectors who can perform a pre-inspection to unearth surprise problems before the buyer's home inspector does. Check out my preferred vendor list.

    Lets say the Big Bad Wolf finds you need a new roof which will cost $10,000. That means that on top of financing for the house, a buyer will have to get an additional 10,000 out of the cookie jar to pay for the repair---buyers don't want to deal with that. Some lenders may not give them a mortgage as a result too.
    The first little piggy will simply deduct the cost but that is no good for some because they may not have the extra cash to do so.
    The second little piggy might offer a reduction for more than the cost of repair as an incentive. The third little piggy would just fix it because something like a new roof is an important selling point. But lets say he couldn't fix it. Well he would consider to have the funds escrowed for the repair cost to be used after closing.
     
    Big Bad Wolf as FHA Lender
    Actually not so bad. The Federal Housing Authority offers incredible financing options for buyers -but it comes with some challenges. The house has to be in decent shape because they want to make sure the house will last more than a day. You can't have loose wires or cracks in the showers or leaks in the roof  For mobiles you have to have hurricane tie downs installed in case a wolf comes by and huffs and puffs. You certainly couldn't have a house made of straw. There are also limits depending on where the house is located.  

    I suggest contacting your lender to go over the guidelines. If you need suggestions on who to talk to, give me a call.

    Big Bad Wolf as Credit
    It is so important to be ready to buy a property. That begins with knowing your credit and things to clean any messy debris left by previous huffs and puffs from other Big Bad Wolf.  Sometimes were are our own worst wolves.  Before falling in love with a house to buy, you need to know what you are prequalified for.  Again I can help you find a great mortgage broker to help you--just remember it serves nobody to not be honest about everything in your finances.

    Big Bad Wolf as Appraiser
    These days an appraisal is ordered by the bank and then no one other than the listing agetn can even talk to them. After the financial crisis of the 2008. the Big Bd Government stepped in to try and separate the percieved cusshy lender, realtor, appraior relationship which may have over inflated hoem values whihc created a lot of home buyers later with upside mortgages.  I make sure to meet with the appraisor to give realistic comps and any notes on them that may impact value. In the end overpricing a home won't help anyone.


    These days it seems there are so many Big Bad Wolves getting in the way of buying a home--and a bunch of little piggies asking too much for their homes, little piggy buyers not wanting to reach very deep into their piggy banks to buy your home and a bunch of capitalist piggies reaching out to get paid in fees and whatever.

    Well it isn't really that bad. Life isn't really a Fairy Tale. So let me help you through the Beauty and the Beast of Buying without having to Go Off to See the Wizard or finding the goose that layed the Golden Egg.

     

    ®2010, Michael Travis

     I can't remember where the illustration of the Wolf came from so if it is yours please send me your info so I can provide proper credit for it. Thank you 

     

     

    My life with Miss GPS How technology changed my life in real estate

     

    My life with Miss GPS 

     

    From the time man invented the wheel, man needed directions. 

    When I first got my drivers license I would just go anywhere--getting lost was an adventure. Everyone had a car in my native Michigan and all roads are marked with legible signs.

    Within 48 hours of graduating from college, I moved to New York City where my only need for transportation came with a loud whistle to hail a cab with bad brakes and lousy suspension and repeated screams of addresses or landmarks to a driver whose third or forth language was broken English at best --in the city you only needed to know how to count-- 23rd Street followed 24th Street then 25th.  Queens was a challenge since it would be 23rd Street followed by 23rd Road, then Avenue then Boulevard then Drive--then 24th Street, then Road, then Avenue ---yadahyadah. 

    Then I got a weekend house in Connecticut only 3 turns and 3 hours away from my apartment in the city. To my friends in the Hamptons, it was only 5 turns -- half the distance and twice the traffic.

    Then I moved to Boston. I had to use a few more synopses to know where the roads were--which were designed by cows in the pre-horseless carriage days.

    Then I moved to Northwood, New Hampshire where not only did I not know where I was--but nobody did.  But then again, all I needed to know was  I-93, Rt 4, and a couple of roads past the refrigerators in someone's yard where you buy fresh eggs by putting your money in a tin box inside.

    Then I got into Real Estate--just when Mapquest became really ok -Thank God. 

    I chose to focus on waterfront properties which meant I went on every unmarked road in the state--my first sale was in Newton, NH where the map I paid a buck for had the road in the wrong location--along with every other retail map I found--How I sold a house I couldn't find on a map is beyond me. 

    By the way where are the frick'n signs for the roads here? And whatever happened to those people who work at gas stations who could actually give you directions?

    My first year in real estate, I put 45,000 miles on my car pushing it past the car warranty that was suppose to last 3 years.

    But you see, when I took a client on showings--I had the secret weapon in my possession--sheets and sheets of Mapquest printouts---I could master holding 3 sheets, one steering wheel and a Vendi Shmende Café Mocha Frappe Machiaotte Latte Grande from Starbucks.

    One day, the agent I was suppose to meet with on the second house calls my cell phone to change the appointment so I continue to drive with the fearful watchful eyes of the clients in my car as I handle all this chaos, using my left knee to steer while I try and figure out how to get to destination B from destination E. Then I drop the Mapquest sheets with the important page landing on the floor by my client's right shoe in the passenger side.

    Thank another God for introducing the GPS that talks to you. I call her Miss GPS. What a marvel she is. She can find me a restaurant, a hotel, an attraction, a gas station, even a hospital if I take my eye off the road plugging in a new address--not recommended by the way. It has a dictionary and an MP3 player-- and most importantly --she gives me directions on a huge 3.5 inch screen.  

    I can even choose her voice--so naturally, as a red blooded American Male I chose the British Woman's voice--always a sucker for accents. (Southern Belle accent not available)

    Sometimes Miss GPS would say MAAAAplewood Avenue, and sometimes Maaaplewood Avenue--but she never says zed for zero.  And when I make a wrong turn, she politely tells me to make a u-turn--make a u-turn--or gives me another direction that only adds 2 and half hours to the trip. 

    One time I had a 2 million dollar client with me, and Miss GPS took me around a big 15 mile circle as she had a pothole induced hiccup that made her want to go back to where she came from. It was so good to be able to blame technology versus my own incompetence. Not sure my client bought into that story--did sell them the house though.

    Isn't technology great that allows me to take direction from a British voice in a box--though it might be a nice change of pace if Miss GPS would occasionally strike up a conversation. Say "you idiot you missed your turn" or "there is a speed trap up ahead" As long as she doesn't ask "how do I feel?"  or  "what are you thinking?" .

     

    Michael Travis can be found traveling the state looking at properties. Visit www.WaterfrontAgent.com and see why he puts on 45,000 miles a year on any car he has--sharing every mile with his Garmin NUVI 350 GPS which he affectionately calls Miss GPS.

     

     

    Michael Travis Your Waterfront Agent

     

    Loons?the perfect bird with the imperfect landing

    Loons–the perfect bird with the imperfect landing.

      Common Loon or Great Northern DiverGavia immer 

     

    Loons have always been a big part of my life even before I ever saw them “in the flesh”–or is it “in the feather”.

    I remember when I watched the Academy Award winning film written by Ernest Thompson “On Golden Pond” It is a story of the relationship between Ethyl Thayer (played by everyone’s favorite mother, Katherine Hepburn) Norman Thayer (played by real father Henry Fonda) and his daughter Chelsea -(played by real daughter Jane Fonda)  and her boyfriend (played by her not real boyfriend Dabney Coleman) and 13 year old son (played by Doug McKeon real son to someone’s parents.)

    On Golden Pond Click here for  a link on the movie.

    You see, before I came to live and enjoy the New Hampshire lakes, I heard the loon’s distinctive call  in the theme music for “On Golden Pond”. The music was written by Dave Grusin, conducted by Eric Kunzel and performed by the Cincinatti Pops.

    Our family had an island up in McGregor Bay, Ontario where loons were everywhere. My wonderful childhood memories include these magnificent birds.

    And when you think of water birds, you think of their uncanny abilities to navigate the skies above like those orderly Canadian Geese in formation.  You think of their grace like that of the swan on a quiet pond, You think of their colorful displays like Flamingos (whose color have much to do with their diet). You think of their families of babies, like the Wood Duck swimming in groups.

     

    The loon color scheme is quite simple–black and white with red eyes and blue all over (the blue is the water).

    Loons are very good swimmers, using their feet to propel themselves above and under water and their wings for assistance. I have seen them swim under water right past a dock I was on. It was like a torpedo--very cool.

    To watch them fly is an experience–but not as much of one watching them land.  Loons need an entire lake to take off —and only 2 feet of space to land–actually crash land. Because their feet are set far back on the body, loons are poorly adapted to moving on land. They usually avoid going onto land, except when nesting.

    The larger loons have difficulty taking off from land and must swim into the wind to pick up enough velocity to get airborne. Only the Red-throated Diver can take off from land.

    The beauty of these birds is not to watch them swim or fly–They can disappear under water for long distances and show anywhere after what seems far longer than we with huge lungs could hold.(I can barely hold my breath for 1 1/2 minutes)

     

    So if you would like to cherish my passion for loons feel free to order from a full line of fun "I'm not the only loon on the lake" items

    Click here http://www.zazzle.com/waterfrontagent

    Tamworth, NH - New England as it was when it was New

        Tamworth began with the granting of a charter from George the Third of England to the town in the name of Benning Wentworth in 1766.
    By 1790 there were 47 heads of families in Tamworth; 126 by 1800. Parson Samuel Hidden was ordained here in 1792 and led the town for nearly fifty years.  
         The hardy people of Tamworth, sustained, by strong religious faith, able to survive through the smallpox epidemic of 1813; the "cold years" and famines of 1815, '16, and '17; the "siege of the wolves" on Great Hill in 1820; and the year 1827, when it snowed in every month.
        As soon as the first farms were established, saw mills, shingle mills, and turning mills proliferated in every part of town. Houses, churches, and schools were built close to them, forming the villages of South Tamworth, Whittier Chocorua, Wonalancet and Tamworth. Industry and inventiveness flourished. Loggers, blacksmiths, millers, shoemakers, storekeepers, furniture- and barrel-makers plied their trades. Nearly all were farmers too.
        Tamworth and surrounding towns gained an economic base from the surrounding beauty of the spectacular mountains and valleys, lakes and rivers, fields and forests that New Hampshire is still known for. To supply the growing number of visitors with places to stay and food, the farmers and their wives opened their homes to summer boarders. In the 1870s, the Blaisdales charged up to 12 quests at $1 per day or $5 for a week at the Fleetwood Farm (then called the "Fairview")  


        Many of the newcomers originally came as tourists to enjoy the scenic beauty and outdoor activities. Later many chose to stay on as second home owners or permanent residents. Perhaps the most famous was President Grover Cleveland, whose son Francis Cleveland founded The Barnstormers Theatre with his wife Alice in 1931. -the oldest professional summer theater in the country. Gorver's home is just up the street from Fleetwood Farm.
        With this cultural roots in the 1700s, it is no surprise that Tamworth is still known today for its artistic, literary and religious organizations. The town currently boasts two public libraries, an art gallery, the Arts Council of Tamworth, the Tamworth Historical Society, the Tamworth Foundation, six churches, The Barnstormers, and many resident authors, poets and artists.
    It is a town that stands still in time, yet still has an active rich history still moving forward. Professional plays are still being performed, It is a town where you can have a home cooked meal at The Other Store surrounded by everything you would find in a general store from hardware, fising lures, kids toys magazines and fishing poles. Tamworth is New England like it was when it was "New".  Its charm and natural beauty never gets old.

     

     

    Online version 

    http://issuu.com/michaeltravis/docs/tamworthinfo?e=2379694/12084403