migration

Where do loons go in the winter.

Where does Larry the Loon go in Winter--you would be surprised perhaps. 

In an effort to beat the Holiday Rush, Larry the Loon flew south early only to find his loon friends just fly to the ocean on the East Coast for winter."


Loons certainly are my favorite. I see them come early in spring even when the ice has not fully melted. A was there when a pair showed up on Swains Lake in Barrington with ice patches still floating about. I saw twelve come flying in to the edge of the ice melt in a cove on Jenness Pond in Northwood and later I witnessed the day 2 loon chicks born on a man-made protective floating nest platform on Jenness Pond, and then create 2 chicks in spring with each sharing time to sit on the eggs. I saw 24 together on Little Bow in Northwood, and a record 24 loons on Ayers Lake in Barrington.

But I live in New Hampshire and see droves of people-and birds-flock south in winter. I mean why not. But have you seen a loon try to fly. It takes half a lake to take off.

So where do loons actually go and why? 

Well according to satellite tracking performed by the Loon Preservation Committees the loon makes its way to the Atlantic Ocean between Maine and Rhode Island. Loons must adapt to life in the salt water. They have salt glands in their skull between their eyes that remove the salt from the water and the fish they eat and then remove it from ducts in their beak--how do they know this stuff I am now sure.

The reasons are unique as well. For one the salt water doesn't freeze, and a loon's livelihood is in the water the oceans provide deep and clear waters to dive and fish in. The adult loons leave their chicks behind until their feathers become long enough to support their own weight. It is also time for the young ones to become mature and strong enough to be independent and capable of surviving on their own before taking the trip to the ocean. 

For two, the warmer waters bring all kinds of different predators like Alligators plus the water actually is too warm for them to dive.  I think maybe the long trip is just too much of an effort.

Life on the ocean isn't easy. They have to get use to a totally new diet, and then there are much bigger waves they are not use to on smaller lakes, and rougher weather, marine pollution and nasty parasites not seen on their fresh water homes. One of a loons biggest challenges has to do with molting and getting their feathers ready to make the trip back to their birth lakes in New Hampshire. It takes 2 to 3 weeks to molt during which that time they are not able to fly and face a lot of dangers lurking. As hyou can imagine, this becomes a stressful time in their lives. Yet I am told that they mate for life so maybe, perhaps their solid relationships help to deal with hard times.

 In New Hampshire ice out is a big mystery for us humans to know the moment when the ice that has covered Lake Winnipesaukee for the winter will melt enough for the iconic M/S Mount Washington cruise ship to navigate between all of its ports in Alton Bay, Center Harbor, Weirs Beach, Meredith and Wolfeboro. Yet somehow the loon has the ability to pretty much pretty much Loons will typically arrive on New Hampshire’s lakes and ponds just after ice-out, sometimes on the very next day!

For me the loon was first introduced to me in the iconic movie "On Golden Pond" staring Kathryn Hepburn and Jane and real father Henry Fonda which happens to be filmed in Squam Lake and Lake Winnipesaukee here. The screen play written by NH resident Ernest Thompson.

I have lived on a lake in New Hampshire ever since leaving Michigan, NYC, and Boston and look forward to the distinctive haunting call of the loon. It is the beginning of summer when I hear them.   

For more information on these incredible loons check out the  Loon Preservation Committee’s at www.loon.org and the N.H. Lakes Association at www.nhlakes.org.

 

Below is a story on a pair of loons on Jenness Pond in Northwood NH who have come every year for over a decade making a family.

Did the Pandemic Create Demand for Waterfront or Second Homes in New Hampshire

DID THE PANDEMIC CREATE AN UNHEALTHY DEMAND

I have never seen a frenzie for waterfront buyers like I have seen in this real estate market. New Hampshire has for the last few years had low inventory. The change is that the Pandemic has created a demand. 

What's good for a seller is so tough for the buyers. And buyers are buying properties sight unseen, paying way over asking, waiving inspections or putting huge concessions on appraisals. Not necessarily the best for the buyer really.

MIGRATION IS FOR MORE THAN JUST THE BIRDS

We can talk about the migration trends. Are people flocking here like the birds in Spring. Or are they here to stay. Sellers think everyone from NYC are moving here. Or even Boston because they can now ZOOM up and work from a new home outside of the city. In reality the migration is real in every metropolitan area but really to the surrounding burbs. Manhattanites have moved to Brooklyn or their place in the Hamptons or Jersey City and Florida. That migration actually isn't the case so much.

I am seeing more buyers from Connecticut, New Jersey and Rhode Island and always from the Boston Area. 20 years ago, I moved here from Boston after living in Manhattan and CT for the same reasons people are coming here now. It was right after 911. I needed a life change then--but then my business at the time did not require me going into an office as I was a designer working from home. I also didn't need to be paying over $2,000 per month plus parking in rent. I bought my shack on a lake for $144k—way cheaper than rent-though I discovered what “seasonal” meant when I moved in on a day in January. It just is not too comfortable with single paned widows and little to no insulation. I had two pair of rose colored glasses on—however I also knew how to use a hammer. Apparently not any electrical tools as in the first week I blew out my computer TV and answering machine not following all the directions from my Home Depot Renovation Book.

I believe the pandemic has fast forwarded a trend that was happening already. People wanting more space. Home offices. and everything delivered. Have you seen the Malls--they are empty.

I have heard that 50% of the workers in Boston are simply not going back to an office. In the same respect I have heard that 4 Million people in this country last month have chosen simply not work at all. Not sure how that works--really for anyone or any business. I see so many signs everywhere looking for workers, with signing bonuses and way higher than minimum wage.

The frenzie I am seeing are really those who have money looking for a place they can reconnect with nature. That is what a waterfront has always been about. Most of the buyers I see are still buying a waterfront home for a second home and increasingly for a second income with hopes of gaining the VRBO or AirBNB world. I saw a 525k average house on a small average lake go for 680k in an area that never saw these kind of prices. There were at least 60 showings every 15 minutes, everyone wearing masks, and at least 23 offers mostly cash which meant there were 22 buyers going on to the next one. It did have $39,000 in rental income already in place for the summer. Amazing.

I caution buyers to think about what they are buying and the true value of it for renters to want to rent. Just like in Real Estate, Location Location Location. Turnkey is Key. And now you may need to contend with neighbors and towns restricting it.

So how long will this frenzie last? For me I see the demand staying in place. Again I am mostly talking waterfront homes. You can see on WaterfrontAgent.com in the section on "New Listings This Week" or plug in www.NewWatefrontForSale.com and see properties already pending within days.

In the end it is always worth living on the water.

 

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