New Hampshire Happenings

When the lake and mountain view is as inspired as the house behind you.

There are homes with great views. There are great homes that are astounding just to look at. When you combine both it truly is the perfect blend of man and nature. Take the case in point of 23 Newport Drive in New Durham, NH. The home itself is an architectural masterpiece in every way.

Mountain living presents its own challenges. This home is built to withstand mountain top living while preserving views and the aesthetics of the surrounding beauty  with 50+ year shingles, high density spray foam insulation throughout, massive wood trusses and huge windows, radiant heat on marble and wood floors guaranteeing a warm setting even in the dead of winter. Each of the bedrooms have their own tiled ensuite bathroom. There's a game room you never want to leave. The chefs kitchen takes advantage of the views. The Great Room with towering cathedral ceiling sand impressive stone fireplace is - well greater than most. The custom 4 inch thick front door looks like something you would find in the greatest castles in England. The craftsmanship and attention to the finest details will never disappoint. Even your dogs have their own kennel with an indoor/outdoor opening to their own third of an acre fenced in play area to roam.

To take in the views you have panoramic windows and a 90 plus foot deck comprising of over 1500 sf of mahogany decking. There is also a private balcony off one of the second floor bedrooms. Enjoy an evening fire in the covered outdoor stone fireplace on the deck as well.

Now lets add a 36x50ft custom barn with two sets of 12 foot barn doors to accommodate heavy equipment and a heated fully equipped shop upstairs. There is a heated bathroom inside so you never have to go back to the home to interrupt your work. The concrete on the floor is set up for easy removal incase an owner wants to convert it into horse stables.

 

 

 

What may be most compelling about this property is the million dollar view-Perhaps it is really a 2 million dollar view of the entire #NewHampshire Lakes Region including 44,000 acre Lake #Winnipesaukee and all the surrounding majestic lakes and mountains. Sited on the top of Copple Crown facing west you have never ending and always changing sunsets. The view never gets old.

For a detailed book on this incredible property Click Here

Here is an video tour you won't want to miss. Click Here

For more information call Michael Travis, Realtor, Bean Group 4 Stevens Avenue, Meredith, NH Office: (800) 450-7784- at Cell: 603-303-2599 or visit www.LakeAndMountainViews.com

 

 

Michael Travis Your Waterfront Agent

Selling you home is more than just listing it on MLS.

With over 1,300 lakes surrounded by a state that is 86% trees, people come here to enjoy the best that Mother Nature offers. A big part of my job is to help buyer realize and live their dreams. Your lake home is part of that dream. 

I have lived on or near water my entire life. My family even owned a private island, 9 miles by boat and 28 miles by car to the nearest town called Little Current — and that was an overstatement. I understand and appreciate the emotions and fond memories attached to such special places.

Prior to a real estate career which began in 2004, I spent 35 years in advertising as an art director, writer, photographer, and designer in NYC and Boston. I have worked with three US Presidents, a five-star General, countless celebrities, corporate moguls, top fashionistas, and well over 450 different accounts in every category. This included marketing multi-million dollar homes for a Boston-based real estate company that has since become a Sotheby's affiliate. I’ve expanded my skills to include drone aerial imaging, videos, electronic and printed brochures, social media and so much more. 

I have two sites of my own--one is dedicated to waterfront homes and the other is a more general. 

Web:  www.BuySellHomesNH.com

Web:  www.WaterfrontAgent.com

As a real estate agent, I have consistently been a multi-million dollar performer. I have marketed, helped sell, and sold properties on more different bodies of water than any agent in the state of New Hampshire. I am a member of the Luxury Home Portfolio, Institute of Luxury Home Marketing, Haute Residence International, Proxio Pro International, and Bean Group’s esteemed Platinum Collection. 

I believe real estate is about marketing. I believe my unique background and talents, combined with the Bean Group dominance in the marketplace, will prove to successfully promote your home like no other. Whether you are a buyer or seller, I bring real-life experience to your real estate experience. Below is a link to a feature story in Top Agent Magazine that says it all.

Featured in "Top Agent Magazine"--Read the Story by Clicking Here!

I am also a premier agent for Realtor.com, Trulia and Zillow so the exposure for your property will be maximized. And of course the Bean Group is the finest real estate company in the state I believe in maximizing exposure of your home to the world. 

I wanted to mention that I am also heavily invested in social media. In fact I started a closed Facebook Group called "Lakes Region Realtors" for agents to talk to each other about listings, safety issues and other info. I am also involved with several other real estate groups to help market your home.   

I look forward to partnering with you to help market and sell your property.

Thank you

MichaelTravis

603-303-2599 

Morning in America - on Long Pond - Northwood NH

Morning again in America, on Long Pond in Northwood, New Hampshire, Morning begins, like on any of the 1300 or so lakes & ponds in this state, as a quiet opening act where you begin to hear the birds come alive, the subtle ripples of water made by ducks floating, the fish jumping, or the occasional kayaker's paddle.  Time stands still here - even in motion. So can call me to find yourself in a lake home as special as the lake is. 603-303-2599

 

Morning in America -- on Long Pond from Waterfront Agent on Vimeo.

Building boats that build character

My Daughter Mariella, age 15 by her wonderful Canoe she built, The "Free Spirit"

Since 1992, the Boat Museum in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire had the idea of preserving the boating heritage of the New Hampshire Lakes for all of us to remember. For me, beginning at 8:30 Am on July 5th, 2011 it became a place to actually build a boat with my fifteen-year-old daughter Mariella, a time for us to never forget.
In an age of instant messaging, instant this and instant that, so many things grab the attention of peoples lives. And, here we were, getting up early in the morning, standing under tents in 80+ degree weather for at least 6 hours a day for 6 days, making a boat that requires teamwork, patience, time, diligence and a lot of learning. It was hard work. It was hot. Yet Mariella would be knocking on my shoulder to wake me up to get going.
In my life, boats have always built fond memories; from challenging fellow 8 year old campers in canoes cut in half at Camp Deerhorn in Wisconsin, sailing at my grandfather’s place on Lake Michigan, traveling by boat everywhere before being allowed to drive a car at our family’s island cottage in Canada, cruising in Boston Harbor, enjoying the views from the Mt Washington on Winnipesaukee, and morning kayaking on a small lake in Northwood with my daughter.
Building a boat brings a whole new level of memories to cherish.

Building Boats, My Early Years.
I remember as a kid helping to build a “McGregor Bay Sled” up at our family’s cottage in Canada. These were big flat bottom utility boats, 4 feet wide, 16 feet long, and could carry anything, weighed a ton, and go anywhere slow. It was made with heavy marine plywood, a bunch of bolts, gallons of glue, and some lead paint I am sure. When the transom rotted, we would simply cut off the bad part, move it forward and screw it back on until it got so bow heavy that the propeller stuck out of the water in the stern. It took two weeks and 5 of us to build.

Building Boats, Our Wolfeboro Week
At the Boat Museum, Mariella and I built something far more elegant, far more refined, and far less heavy. It is called a “six-hour canoe” –The six-hour part –well that was how long it took for us to put the two sides together. It was really a six-day canoe for us. We made it by hand out of wood—cutting, bending, nailing, screwing, planning, sanding, fiberglassing, varnishing, and painting--into a masterpiece –using the many tools provided--and a lot of patience.
We also were able to add personal touches including a curved deck on the bow and stern held down by brass nails and a few brass goodies from Bradley's Hardware and Goodhue and Hawkins.

 

For the price of a normal summer camp, the New Hampshire Boat Museum Boat Building Program---well you came away with a beautiful boat, and memories that will last a lifetime.


“Free Spirit”, a canoe designed in the past, was built with newly learned skills, by Mariella’s own talented hands.
 

Here is a video my daughter made of the making of Free Spirit.

Video on Mariella's "Free Spirit" at the Boat Building School NH

Building Free Spirit was an great experience. And it only took six days!  Enjoy :)

Posted by Mariella Travis on Friday, September 2, 2011
 
                               
Check out the Boat Building Program and other events won't you?

 

New Hampshire Boat Museum

399 Center St., Wolfeboro Falls, NH

EMAIL

museum@nhbm.org

WEB SITE:

http://www.nhbm.org

603.569.4554

HOURS

OPEN: Memorial Day Weekend through Columbus Day

Monday through Saturday 10 – 4
Sunday Noon – 4

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    Tamworth, NH - New England as it was when it was New

        Tamworth began with the granting of a charter from George the Third of England to the town in the name of Benning Wentworth in 1766.
    By 1790 there were 47 heads of families in Tamworth; 126 by 1800. Parson Samuel Hidden was ordained here in 1792 and led the town for nearly fifty years.  
         The hardy people of Tamworth, sustained, by strong religious faith, able to survive through the smallpox epidemic of 1813; the "cold years" and famines of 1815, '16, and '17; the "siege of the wolves" on Great Hill in 1820; and the year 1827, when it snowed in every month.
        As soon as the first farms were established, saw mills, shingle mills, and turning mills proliferated in every part of town. Houses, churches, and schools were built close to them, forming the villages of South Tamworth, Whittier Chocorua, Wonalancet and Tamworth. Industry and inventiveness flourished. Loggers, blacksmiths, millers, shoemakers, storekeepers, furniture- and barrel-makers plied their trades. Nearly all were farmers too.
        Tamworth and surrounding towns gained an economic base from the surrounding beauty of the spectacular mountains and valleys, lakes and rivers, fields and forests that New Hampshire is still known for. To supply the growing number of visitors with places to stay and food, the farmers and their wives opened their homes to summer boarders. In the 1870s, the Blaisdales charged up to 12 quests at $1 per day or $5 for a week at the Fleetwood Farm (then called the "Fairview")  


        Many of the newcomers originally came as tourists to enjoy the scenic beauty and outdoor activities. Later many chose to stay on as second home owners or permanent residents. Perhaps the most famous was President Grover Cleveland, whose son Francis Cleveland founded The Barnstormers Theatre with his wife Alice in 1931. -the oldest professional summer theater in the country. Gorver's home is just up the street from Fleetwood Farm.
        With this cultural roots in the 1700s, it is no surprise that Tamworth is still known today for its artistic, literary and religious organizations. The town currently boasts two public libraries, an art gallery, the Arts Council of Tamworth, the Tamworth Historical Society, the Tamworth Foundation, six churches, The Barnstormers, and many resident authors, poets and artists.
    It is a town that stands still in time, yet still has an active rich history still moving forward. Professional plays are still being performed, It is a town where you can have a home cooked meal at The Other Store surrounded by everything you would find in a general store from hardware, fising lures, kids toys magazines and fishing poles. Tamworth is New England like it was when it was "New".  Its charm and natural beauty never gets old.

     

     

    Online version 

    http://issuu.com/michaeltravis/docs/tamworthinfo?e=2379694/12084403

     

     

     

     

    Best Places to Visit in New Hampshire White Mountains

     

    Below is a story from one of my favorite New England magazines, Yankee. This is a story about the

    Best of the New Hampshire White Mountains

    2014 Editors' Choice Awards by Yankee Magazine

    You can link directly to the article by Clicking Here


    Heading to the White Mountains of New Hampshire this year? Along with classics like driving the Kanc and taking the kids to Story Land or Santa's Village, we've got the perfect roundup of what to see, do, and eat while you explore the Whites, plus where to stay when it's time for bed. Read on to see our picks for the best of the White Mountains for 2014, then let us know your favorites!
     

    BEST WHITE MOUNTAINS ATTRACTIONS

     

    BEST STATE PARK:

    FRANCONIA NOTCH STATE PARK, Franconia/Lincoln

    This park is home to state treasures such as the Flume Gorge, the Cannon Mountain Aerial Tramway, and the Old Man of the Mountain Profile Plaza and Historic Site. Route 93. 603-745-8391; nhstateparks.org/explore/state-parks/franconia-notch-state-park.aspx

    BEST ART GALLERY:
    LEAGUE OF NH CRAFTSMEN LITTLETON RETAIL GALLERY, Littleton

    Everything here (jewelry, baskets, pottery, fiber arts, glass, and more) is made by hand by New Hampshire artists. Inspired? Sign up for a class taught by league members at the nearby Littleton Studio School. 81 Main St. (at The Village Book Store). 603-444-1099; nhcrafts.org/localsites/littleton

    BEST ADRENALINE-RUSH TRAIN RIDE:
    MOUNT WASHINGTON COG RAILWAY, Bretton Woods

    When it comes to memorable, you can't beat traveling by steam engine up the steepest railroad track in North America to the 6,288-foot summit of Mount Washington. 3168 Base Station Road. 603-278-5404; thecog.com

     

    BEST WHITE MOUNTAINS LODGING


    BEST FAMILY INN:
    CHRISTMAS FARM INN & SPA, Jackson

    Near Storyland and Santa's Village, this inn offers a playground, swimming pool, and nightly movies for the kids, plus Jacuzzis, fireplaces, and a spa for you. Two-night minimum. Rates: from $99. 3 Blitzen Way. 603-383-4313; christmasfarminn.com


    BEST VIEW FROM AN INN:
    1785 INN, North Conway

    With a footprint spanning six prime mountain acres, it's no wonder this inn has some of the best views of the Presidential Range. Soak in the vista from poolside, surrounded by a garden of tall, spikey pink-and-white cleomes, or from the dining room's bay window while sampling cuisine that has garnered a host of culinary awards. Rates: from $69. 3582 White Mountain Highway. 603-356-9025; the1785inn.com
     

    BEST WHITE MOUNTAINS DINING

    BEST TRAIN DINING:
    CAFÉ LAFAYETTE DINNER TRAIN, North Woodstock

    It takes only 20 miles to travel back to a more gracious era aboard the three vintage Pullman cars of the Café Lafayette Dinner Train. Diners enjoy a five-course meal with a side of stunning river, mountain, and forest views. Blazing fall foliage is a seasonal bonus. Adults: from $80. Route 112. 603-745-3500; nhdinnertrain.com

    BEST BREWPUB:
    MOAT MOUNTAIN SMOKE HOUSE & BREWING CO., North Conway

    This venue's two essential products--beer and barbecue--are made on the premises, and both are among the best of their kind. Beers lean toward light and crisp (wheat, pale ale, pilsner, even blueberry ale) while the barbecue is big on smoke and sugar (the salmon is almost candied!). Entrées: from $12. 3378 White Mountain Highway (Route 16). 603-356-6381; moatmountain.com

    BEST WINE CELLAR DINING:
    MOUNTAIN VIEW GRAND RESORT & SPA, Whitefield

    The candlelit tables surrounded by bins holding 6,500 bottles are undeniably romantic. Food such as lobster-scallop stew and roasted locally farmed venison fit the elegant setting. Gentlemen will want a jacket and ladies will like a wrap, as the wine cellar stays cool all year round. Entrées: from $31. 101 Mountain View Road. 855-837-2100; mountainviewgrand.com

    BEST NEW MENU:
    SNOWVILLAGE INN, Eaton Center

    The inn's new chef, Brian Anderson, pulls from local farms for his flavorful cuisine. Fan favorites include lobster corn chowder with pea shoots and cedar-plank salmon with blueberry port glacé. Rates: from $149. 136 Stewart Road. 603-447-2818; snowvillageinn-whitemountains.com
     

    MORE WHITE MOUNTAINS FUN


    The Mount Washington Observatory | New England's Weather Station
    Driving the Kancamagus Highway in Winter
    Franconia Ridge Loop | The Perfect White Mountains Hike
    North Woodstock, New Hampshire | Village in the White Mountains
    Ossipee Lake and North Conway, NH | A Late Fall Visit to the White Mountains
    Sugar Hill Lupine Festival | Must-See Event in New Hampshire
    Zipline Tour at Bretton Woods or Gunstock
    The Omni Mount Washington Resort | A Winter Weekend Getaway

     


    Please Note: This information was accurate at the time of publication. When planning a trip, please confirm details by directly contacting any company or establishment you intend to visit.

    Tags: Best of New England, White Mountains

     

    Wolfeboro, Americas's Oldest Summer Resort-Historic and Beautiful

    For over 250 years, Wolfeboro has been the destination of choice for dignitaries, celebrity, heads of State, heads of business, heads of households and families that can appreciate the fresh New Hampshire air, surrounded by the most beautiful lake and mountains. No wonder French President Sarkozy chose Wolfeboro for his historic visit to the US.

     

         Wolfeboro is a place of picturesque shops and historic buildings, free concerts at the town bandstand at waters edge.  It is a place where you can charter antique boat rides or have a dinner cruise on the MS Mount Washington. A place where you can see original plays in the theatre to concerts at the performing arts center. It is a place with one of the longest Forth of July Parades with antique cars, World War ll vehicles and even Presidential Candidates participate. You have your choice of classic diner fare to exquisite restaurants, quaint B&Bs, the historic Wolfeboro Inn, rustic cabin rentals to multi million dollar homes for rent.
    From the town docks and ramps, you have access to all of Lake Winnipesaukee at your disposal. There are also four public beaches and so much more. 
    With a base population of just over 6000 that jumps to 35,000 in the heart of summer, you have small town charm yet big town services including Huggins Hospital as well as everything you need and some things you won't find anywhere. It has its own ski hill and ice rink. It is home to Brewster Academy which attracts students from around the world.  
    Wolfeboro is under two hours from Boston, an hour to the seacoast and the White Mountains, making it the perfect destination year round. In spring and fall, the weather is ideal for golf, hiking, biking, fishing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking and birding.  The winter in Wolfeboro provides access to hundreds of miles of snowmobile trails and more than 18 miles of groomed cross-country ski trails.              
     
    Wolfeboro History
    Wolfeboro, settled in 1768, was granted by Governor John Wentworth and named for General Wolfe, a hero of the Battle of Quebec.  Colonial Governor John Wentworth, his nephew, established Kingswood, an estate on Lake Wentworth, making it the "Oldest Summer Resort in America" .  With the end of the Civil War and the building of the Wolfeboro Railroad in 1872, tourism began to come to this charming town. The historic Depot building still remains. The track now serves as an 11 mile walking and bike path past Crescent Lake and Lake Wentworth, ending in the town of Wakefield.